Latest News

Facts about the Coronavirus/Covid-19 in American Sign Language

We at Mill Neck Family of Organizations care about our students, individuals we serve, families, staff members and our communities. We want you to have access to the Facts on Coronavirus or COVID19. We are using the message sent out by UNICEF in ASL and International Sign. Please share.

Facts about the Coronavirus/Covid-19 in International Sign

We at Mill Neck Family of Organizations care about our students, individuals we serve, families, staff members and our communities. We want you to have access to the Facts on Coronavirus or COVID19. We are using the message sent out by UNICEF in ASL and International Sign. Please share.

Visor Card Bill Passes

CBS news came to the Mill Neck Manor campus to interview Mill Neck Services staff and legislator Joshua Lafazan on a very important bill that passed in September. This bill directs the Nassau County Police Department to publish “visor cards” for Deaf and Hard of Hearing motorists to identify their preferred method of communication.

Visor Card Bill Passes“This bill is crucial because as a legislator I think our role is to make life better for individuals who are most vulnerable in our society. So, I try to empathize what it would be like for an individual who is Deaf or Hard of Hearing,” said Lafazan. “When I heard about Deaf drivers not being able to communicate properly with the police I realized how tense and scary of an interaction that would be nd the solution is so simple. So for me, it was a question of how do I make life better for people with disabilities and likewise how do we help our police interact with those stakeholders.”

This is a first step to rectify severe communication misunderstandings between Deaf and Hard of Hearing individuals and law enforcement. Great work to Mill Neck Services and all of those involved in getting this bill passed. Another big win for the Deaf community!

Suffolk County Bill Passed

Suffolk County Bill Passed

A long overdue bill was passed after months of advocating for the Deaf community to the Nassau County Legislators. Nassau County Executive Laura Curran signed a bill stating that American Sign Language Interpreters shall be provided at all emergency press conferences held in Nassau County. Read More

A Big Win for the Deaf Community

A long overdue bill was passed after months of advocating for the Deaf community to the Nassau County Legislators. Nassau County Executive Laura Curran signed a bill stating that American Sign Language Interpreters shall be provided at all emergency press conferences held in Nassau County. Read More

Sagamore Hill

MNS Partners with Sagamore Hill

In order to become more Deaf-friendly, Sagamore Hill National Historic Site in Oyster Bay, N.Y., partnered with Mill Neck Services to teach their employees American Sign Language (ASL). Read More

Canine Companions

Mill Neck Interpreters Support Canine Companions

Mill Neck Interpreter Service (MNIS)—a nonprofit agency that provides Sign Language interpreters throughout Long Island and the New York Metropolitan Area—showed their support by attending the February 2018 graduation ceremony for Canine Companions for Independence. Read More

Loretta Murray

Mill Neck Services’ Loretta Murray Receives Long Island Business News’ Diversity in Business Award

Loretta H. Murray, Esq., the Executive Direcand Business News’ Diversity in Business Award.

The award, which is designed to highlight the outstanding achievements of business leaders of diverse ethnic backgrounds and those with disabilities, is a reflection of Loretta’s exemplary career dedication.

“We work with many people who are marginalized by society because of their disability,” she said. “To us, they are family. They know we are concerned for their welfare. People can come to us with any problem or issue, to help them to the best of our ability.”

MNS was created with one goal: to allow Deaf and disabled adults the same access to employment and MNS devoted staff will continue to use their resources to act as advocates for equality in the Deaf and disabled community.
“None of this was done by me alone,” she concluded. “Rather, it was through a village of caring people.”